Australia Post: Apology issued for “racist” sign in front of Adelaide store, public outrage

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Australia Post has issued an apology after people across the country – including a federal politician – expressed their outrage over a “racist” sign.

Shoppers were left shocked after an Australia Post store erected a sign informing customers they could not take passport photos for “Indian” people.

“Due to our lighting and quality of photo background, we unfortunately CANNOT take INDIAN photos!” the sign read.

The sign, which was later shared to social media, apologised for the “inconvenience” and directed customers to a different location.

“The nearest photo place is Camera House on 120 Grenfell Street. We apologise for the inconvenience,” it read.

Minister Communications Michelle Rowland penned a letter to the national postal service saying she had been left “deeply disturbed” by the post.

“The message displayed was unacceptable and has caused great offence,” Ms Rowland said.

“No one should be discriminated against because of the colour of their skin or where they are from.”

Ms Rowland requested Australia Post “publicly apologise for any offence caused”.

In a statement, an Australia Post spokesman told NCA NewsWire they were disappointed in the way the sign was worded, especially as a large portion of the company is culturally diverse.

“Australia Post apologises unreservedly to the community for any offence caused by an unauthorised sign recently displayed at Rundle Mall Post Office.

“As soon as we were made aware, we immediately removed the sign and have spoken with the team member concerned.

“While the wording of this sign is inexcusable, we understand the Indian Consulate had rejected a number of customers’ passport photos provided by this Post Office.

We have reached out the High Commission of India to understand the issue with the photographs, so we can rectify this urgently.

Although no offence was intended, this lapse in judgment falls well below the standard we expect from Australia Post team members.

“It’s especially disappointing given Australia Post prides itself on its commitment to inclusion and diversity both across our workforce and within our communities.

We are fully investigating the issue and will take appropriate action.”

Shocked customers shared the images on social media where hundreds of angry people flocked to the comments.

“That’s insane, they can’t do that,” one person said.

“For the pricing of that sign, they could have fixed the lighting surely?!” said another.

“So it’s only Indians? Other races with dark complexions OK?”

“How hard is it to change the settings?”

But others jumped to the defence of Australia Post, saying Indian passport regulations required a different kind of photograph to gain approval.

“It’s likely because the Indian passport office is really finicky about their photo regulations, that’s probably what they meant,” one person said.

Another man shared his experience working for a “place that did passport photos” but said the sign was stupid.

“Indian passports require a 51x51mm size which is different to cut/print to Aussie passport shots. They also prefer off white background colour too instead of pure white like Aus. It’s quite picky and can be annoying for an employee not set up to do it properly and regularly,” he said.

“It’s just a very poorly worded sign, please chill out,” said another user.

The City Cross location was once considered a dedicated contact centre for passport needs.

Originally published as Public outrage over ‘racist’ sign prompts apology from Australia Post


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