Chris Dawson inspires NSW parliament to introduce bail legislation

C

Convicted killers like Chris Dawson would be denied bail unless they help police locate the body of their victims under new legislation set to be introduced to NSW parliament this week.

The so-called “no body, no parole” laws follows a campaign spearheaded by the family of Lynette Dawson, who was 33 when she disappeared and whose body has never been found.

The legislation will be introduced on Wednesday, and if passed, it will become law next month.

Under the proposed legislation, convicted killers would be denied bail should they put the case forward for an early release, unless they have proven active co-operation, including on locating the body.

If passed, the legislation would impact six people currently serving time for murder or homicide, as well as any future relevant convictions.

It’s understood the laws would include amendments that would stop the State Parole Authority from granting parole to any person serving time for a murder without evidence of their co-operation with investigators, including on disclosing their victim’s whereabouts if not already known.

Premier Dominic Perrottet said the aim was to limit ongoing distress and trauma for the families of victims.

“We will make it impossible for offenders who wilfully and deliberately refuse to disclose information about their victims’ remains, to be granted parole,” Mr Perrottet said.

“Being unable to locate a loved one’s body is extremely distressing and traumatic for the families and friends of victims and it denies a victim the dignity of being laid to rest appropriately.”

Mr Perrottet said the laws were a “common sense and fair approach”.

“Passing this into law will provide immense comfort to families and friends of victims who have gone through unimaginable pain,” he told Nine Radio.

Mr Perrottet said Ms Dawson’s family had been pivotal in introducing the legislation.

Dawson was last month found guilty of murdering his wife in January 1982.

His legal team has flagged they may appeal the verdict.

Corrections Minister Geoff Lee said the reforms were modelled on laws in other jurisdictions.

“Any offender in prison coming up for parole should think really hard about maintaining their refusal to co-operate with police if they want to retain their prospects of getting parole,” Dr Lee said.

Originally published as New bail laws to be introduced inspired by Chris Dawson

Read related topics:Chris Dawson

Source link
Lien puissant
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link
best link

About the author

vQ50azj5tS

Add Comment

vQ50azj5tS

Get in touch

Quickly communicate covalent niche markets for maintainable sources. Collaboratively harness resource sucking experiences whereas cost effective meta-services.